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Reshaping Tomorrow: Is South Asia Ready for the Big Leap? (Record no. 76)

000 -LEADER
fixed length control field 02297nam a2200229Ia 4500
003 - CONTROL NUMBER IDENTIFIER
control field DE-boiza
005 - DATE AND TIME OF LATEST TRANSACTION
control field 20191219130315.0
008 - FIXED-LENGTH DATA ELEMENTS--GENERAL INFORMATION
fixed length control field 190909
020 ## - INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER
International Standard Book Number 978-0-19-807502-8
040 ## - CATALOGING SOURCE
Transcribing agency IZA
100 ## - MAIN ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Ghani, Ejaz
9 (RLIN) 178
Titles and words associated with a name (ed.)
245 #0 - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Reshaping Tomorrow: Is South Asia Ready for the Big Leap?
260 ## - PUBLICATION, DISTRIBUTION, ETC.
Date of publication, distribution, etc. 2011
Name of publisher, distributor, etc. Oxford University Press,
Place of publication, distribution, etc. New York,
300 ## - PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION
Extent 352 pages
340 ## - PHYSICAL MEDIUM
Location within medium O1 57
520 ## - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc. What will South Asia look like in 2025? The optimistic outlook is that India, which accounts for 80 per cent of the regional economic output, is headed towards double-digit growth rates. South Asia too will grow rapidly, primarily due to India. The pessimistic outlook is that, given huge transformational challenges facing the region, growth should not be taken for granted. Which of these two outlooks is likely to prevail? This is what this book is all about. It is about the future, and not the past, and how to make smart choices about the future. There is strong empirical justification in favor of the optimistic outlook. Growth will be propelled higher by young demographics, improved governance, rising middle class, and the next wave of globalization. There is democracy, for the first time since independence, in all countries in the region. Young demographics will result in nearly 20 million more people joining the labour force, every year, for the next two decades. Almost a billion people will join the ranks of the middle class. India's middle class is well-educated, enterprising, innovative, and more demanding of better services, products, and governance. The region will benefit from the new wave of globalization in services, and increased international migration and human mobility. Indeed the drivers of growth seem to have already moved from the rich world to the poor world. The room for catch-up is huge, given the big gap in average income between South Asia and the rich countries.
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name entry element development economics
9 (RLIN) 179
651 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--GEOGRAPHIC NAME
Geographic name South Asia
9 (RLIN) 180
856 ## - ELECTRONIC LOCATION AND ACCESS
Uniform Resource Identifier <a href="http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/311391468101989889/pdf/654200PUB00PUB0ing0Tomorrow0English.pdf">http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/311391468101989889/pdf/654200PUB00PUB0ing0Tomorrow0English.pdf</a>
Link text full-text
Uniform Resource Identifier <a href="http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/311391468101989889/Reshaping-tomorrow-is-South-Asia-ready-for-the-big-leap">http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/311391468101989889/Reshaping-tomorrow-is-South-Asia-ready-for-the-big-leap</a>
Link text World Bank
942 ## - ADDED ENTRY ELEMENTS (KOHA)
Koha item type Anthology
Source of classification or shelving scheme
Holdings
Withdrawn status Lost status Source of classification or shelving scheme Damaged status Not for loan Permanent Location Current Location Date acquired Full call number Barcode Date last seen Price effective from Koha item type
          Library Library 2019-09-12 O1 57 125581 2019-09-12 2019-09-12 Anthology
Deutsche Post Stiftung
 
Istitute of Labor Economics
 
Behavior and Inequality Research Institute
 
Institute for Environment & Sustainability